Posts Tagged ‘type 2 diabetes’

Omega-3 fish oil essential fatty acids Significantly Improves The Endothelial Function

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

Omega-3 fish oil essential fatty acids Significantly Improves The Endothelial Function

Wang Q, Liang X, Wang L, et al. Effect of omega-3 fatty acids supplementation on endothelial function: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Atherosclerosis. 2012 Apr;221(2):536-43.

OBJECTIVE:
Inverse association was reported between omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) supplementation and the risk of cardiovascular disease. Identifying the effect of omega-3 FAs on endothelial function may contribute to explain the association. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the effect of omega-3 FAs supplementation on endothelial function, as measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and endothelium-independent vasodilation (EIV).

METHODS:
Randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) were identified from the databases of PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane library by two investigators and the pooled effects were measured by weighted mean difference (WMD), together with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Subgroup and meta-regression analyses were used to explore the source of between-study heterogeneity.

RESULTS:
Totally 16 eligible studies involving 901 participants were finally included in meta-analysis. Compared with placebo, omega-3 FAs supplementation significantly increased FMD by 2.30% (95% CI: 0.89-3.72%, P=0.001), at a dose ranging from 0.45 to 4.5g/d over a median of 56days. Subgroup analyses suggested that the effect of omega-3 FAs on FMD might be modified by the health status of the participants or the dose of supplementation. Sensitivity analyses indicated that the protective effect of omega-3 on endothelial function was robust. No significant change in EIV was observed after omega-3 FAs supplementation (WMD: 0.57%; 95% CI: -0.88 to 2.01%; P=0.442).
he loss of proper endothelial function, is a hallmark for vascular diseases, and is often regarded as a key early event in the development of atherosclerosis. Impaired endothelial function, causing hypertension and thrombosis, is often seen in patients with coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, as well as in smokers.
CONCLUSION:
Supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids significantly improves the endothelial function without affecting endothelium-independent dilation

Omega-3 key in reducing diabetes and heart disease

Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

Omega-3 key in reducing diabetes and heart disease
Omega-3 can help to reduce the risk of diabetes and heart disease especially as people age, says Massey University nutrition professor Bernhard Breier, co-author of a new international study.

Professor Breier, who leads an international research team, says omega-3s are especially beneficial for health in ageing because they improve carbohydrate and fat metabolism.

His research found a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids helps to burn metabolic fuels (glucose and fat) better, and can regulate energy storage across different tissues. This is despite genetic factors that predispose some people to gain weight more easily, making them potentially more susceptible to conditions such as diabetes and heart disease.

“These findings are important because the ageing process is closely linked with a higher risk of developing metabolic syndrome – a clustering of risk factors for heart disease, diabetes and obesity,” says Professor Breier, Chair of Human Nutrition at the Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health at Albany.

He says omega-3 fatty acids have been found to stimulate the process known as the insulin signalling cascade, which improves how blood sugar is used in the body. Researchers from Germany, Australia and New Zealand carried out tests on mice, examining the effects of feeding omega-3 rich diets to two groups with distinct, genetically determined traits to model different body types and metabolic responses of humans. One group developed obesity more easily and the second was a leaner variety.

When scientists measured changes to the metabolic responses, results showed the omega-3 rich diet reduced cholesterol and improved insulin action and fat metabolism in both groups of mice. However, the obesity prone mice responded less well than the leaner variety, drawing attention to genetically determined pathways that contribute to obesity.

Professor Breier says this study has shown for the first time that the insulin signalling cascade becomes more active with dietary omega-3 fatty acids. “The omega-3 fatty acids in our diet can help how energy in our body is used.”

Thousands of studies have been done on the health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids, with indications it may be beneficial in a range of conditions, from arthritis to heart disease. Professor Breier says this study, published in the journal Nutrition and Metabolism, is the first to provide direct evidence of its role in specific metabolic processes of how blood sugar and fat in our bodies are used.

Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for health but the human body cannot make them, unlike other types of fats. Omega-3s are found in oily fish such as salmon and sardines, as well as walnuts, eggs and flaxseed, and have been shown to help prevent heart disease and stroke as well as playing protective roles for healthy bones and healthy muscle.

The research findings coincide with a recent report from the Ministry of Health’s 2008-2009 diet and nutrition survey, which shows the obesity epidemic in New Zealand has surged in recent years. It reveals 28 per cent of men are obese, compared with 17 per cent at the time of the last survey in 1997. For women, the rate had increased from 21 per cent to 28 per cent. Among Måori, the survey found that 40.7 per cent of men and 48.1 per cent of women were obese.

Professor Breier says the statistics are alarming, and reinforce the need for strong public health programmes to encourage people to eat healthier food and get more exercise to prevent obesity, diabetes and heart disease.

Link to Professor Breier’s paper: http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/8/1/56

Omega 3 EPA the key omega3 to tackle obesity and type 2 diabetes

Saturday, October 8th, 2011

A major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes
and other pro inflammatory life-threatening conditions is the current obesity epidemic which is endemic in developed nations such as United States , United Kingdom , UAE where it’s fueled in large part by excessive consumption of a fat-rich “Western style diet.” The main issue is the increase consumption of saturated fats which are pro inflammatory ie animal fats , sunflower oil , corn oil etc Animal-derived saturated fats like lard and butter are strongly linked to adverse health effects, but unsaturated and polyunsaturated fats from plants and cold-water fish like salmon and mackerel are not. In fact, eating oily fish which is rich in omega3 especially EPA produces beneficial health effects and can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes
For biomedical investigators, the enduring question has been why saturated and unsaturated fatty acids produce such diametrically opposed health effects. Now, in a paper published in the Sept. 30 issue of the journal Cell, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine and colleagues offer an explanation, and a framework that could lead to dietary supplements designed to treat obesity at the molecular level.

“These findings not only explain the long-standing enigma regarding the differential health effects of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids,” said senior author Michael Karin, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology in UC San Diego’s Laboratory of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, “they also provide improved tools and a mechanistic framework for the potential development of dietary supplements to treat obesity, estimated to be worth billions of dollars per year.”

Senior author Karin, first author Ryan G. Holzer, PhD, formerly a graduate student in Karin’s lab and now at the Mayo Clinic, and colleagues began with the observation that saturated fatty acids, such as palmitic acid, are potent activators of Jun kinases (JNK), key regulatory molecules implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, obesity and atherosclerosis. However, unsaturated fatty acids such as palmitoleic acid (POA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) not only do not activate JNK, but actually block JNK activation by palmitic acid.

Palmitic acid and POA differ in molecular structure by the presence of a single unsaturated bond (the absence of two hydrogen atoms) in POA. Cellular membrane fluidity is decreased upon incorporation of saturated fatty acids, which possess rigid hydrocarbon tails, but increased by the incorporation of unsaturated fatty acids with “bent” hydrocarbon tails.

Postulating that the membrane is the only cellular structure that can discriminate between all of these fatty acids, the scientists searched for membrane-associated protein kinases that could account for the differential effects on JNK activity. They ultimately identified c-Src, a membrane-associated tyrosine kinase, as the molecule responsible for activation of JNK by palmitic acid and other saturated fatty acids. They also discovered that saturated fatty acids “push” c-Src into membrane sub-domains of reduced fluidity and increased rigidity, where it accumulates in an activated form that eventually leads to JNK activation.

By contrast, POA and EPA prevent these changes in the membrane distribution of c-Src and — by blocking c-Src aggregation — they inhibit its activation by saturated fatty acids.

Most of the research was conducted using cultured cells (fibroblasts) treated with individual or combined fatty acids, but the scientists also fed mice a high-fat diet (in which 60 percent of the calories were fat-derived) and reported similar c-Src accumulation within membrane subdomains of increased rigidity and JNK activation.

Currently, polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as EPA and structurally-related omega-3 fatty acids are used in the treatment of hyperlipidemia (high blood cholesterol levels) and may be effective in the treatment or prevention of type 2 diabetes. Karin said understanding how EPA works could lead to the identification of even more potent EPA-like molecules.

Funding for this research came from the National Institutes of Health, the Superfund Basic Research Program and the American Diabetes Association.

Co-authors of the paper are Eek-Joong Park, Ning Li, Helen Tran, Monica Chen and Crystal Choi, Laboratory of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Department of Pharmacology, UC San Diego; and Giovanni Solinas, Laboratory of Metabolic Stress Biology, Department of Medicine, Physiology, University of Fribourg, Switzerlan

What is Diabetes

Monday, August 29th, 2011

Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Hyperglycaemia, or raised blood sugar, is a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes and over time leads to serious damage to many of the body’s systems, especially the nerves and blood vessels.
Type 1 diabetes (previously known as insulin-dependent, juvenile or childhood-onset) is characterized by deficient insulin production and requires daily administration of insulin. The cause of type 1 diabetes is not known and it is not preventable with current knowledge.

Symptoms include excessive excretion of urine (polyuria), thirst (polydipsia), constant hunger, weight loss, vision changes and fatigue. These symptoms may occur suddenly.
Type 2 diabetes (formerly called non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset) results from the body’s ineffective use of insulin. Type 2 diabetes comprises 90% of people with diabetes around the world, and is largely the result of excess body weight and physical inactivity.

Symptoms may be similar to those of Type 1 diabetes, but are often less marked. As a result, the disease may be diagnosed several years after onset, once complications have already arisen.

Until recently, this type of diabetes was seen only in adults but it is now also occurring in children.
Gestational diabetes is hyperglycaemia with onset or first recognition during pregnancy.

Symptoms of gestational diabetes are similar to Type 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes is most often diagnosed through prenatal screening, rather than reported symptoms.

Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG)
Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG) are intermediate conditions in the transition between normality and diabetes. People with IGT or IFG are at high risk of progressing to type 2 diabetes, although this is not inevitable.

What are common consequences of diabetes?
Over time, diabetes can damage the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves.

Diabetes increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. 50% of people with diabetes die of cardiovascular disease (primarily heart disease and stroke).
Combined with reduced blood flow, neuropathy in the feet increases the chance of foot ulcers and eventual limb amputation.
Diabetic retinopathy is an important cause of blindness, and occurs as a result of long-term accumulated damage to the small blood vessels in the retina. After 15 years of diabetes, approximately 2% of people become blind, and about 10% develop severe visual impairment.
Diabetes is among the leading causes of kidney failure. 10-20% of people with diabetes die of kidney failure.
Diabetic neuropathy is damage to the nerves as a result of diabetes, and affects up to 50% of people with diabetes. Although many different problems can occur as a result of diabetic neuropathy, common symptoms are tingling, pain, numbness, or weakness in the feet and hands.

Consumption Of Omega-3 essential Fatty acid fish oils Decrease Homocysteine Levels In Diabetic Patients

Friday, July 29th, 2011

Consumption Of Omega-3 FAs Decrease Homocysteine Levels In Diabetic Patients
Pooya S, Jalali MD, Jazayery AD, et al. The efficacy of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on plasma homocysteine and malondialdehyde levels of type 2 diabetic patients. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2009;18.
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Cardiovascular diseases are the major cause of mortality among diabetic patients. The concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) and homocysteine is believed to play a role in cardiovascular diseases. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation could be effective in some diabetes complications and in the control of the glycemic index. However, it may increase lipid peroxidation. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on the concentration of homocysteine and MDA in diabetic patients.

METHODS AND RESULTS: A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted on 81 patients with type 2 diabetes. The patients were randomly assigned to either the treatment or control groups. Each subject received three capsules of omega-3 fatty acids or a placebo every day for a period of 2months. The two groups were similar in terms of body mass index and food intake. At the beginning of the study and after 2months of supplementation their levels of HbA(1)c, homocysteine, MDA, C-reactive protein (CRP), total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and fasting blood sugar (FBS) were determined. Due to omega-3 fatty acid supplementation, homocysteine was changed significantly in both treatment and control groups up to -3.10mumol/L and 0.10mumol/L respectively, and HbA(1)c decreased by 0.75% in the treatment group and increased by 0.26% in the control group. However, the changes in fasting blood sugar (FBS), malondialdehyde (MDA), C-reactive protein (CRP), total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels were not significant.

CONCLUSION: The consumption of omega-3 fatty acid supplements (3g/day) for 2months decreases the levels of homocysteine in diabetic patients with no change in FBS, MDA and CRP levels.

Omega 3 fatty acids induce a marked reduction of apolipoprotein B48 when added to fluvastatin in patients with type 2 diabetes and mixed hyperlipidemia:

Thursday, July 14th, 2011

Mixed hyperlipidemia is common in patients with diabetes. Statins, the choice drugs, are effective at reducing lipoproteins that contain apolipoprotein B100, but they fail to exert good control over intestinal lipoproteins, which have an atherogenic potential. We describe the effect of prescription omega 3 fatty acids on the intestinal lipoproteins in patients with type 2 diabetes who were already receiving fluvastatin 80 mg per day.
Methods
Patients with type 2 diabetes and mixed hyperlipidemia were recruited. Fasting lipid profile was taken when patients were treated with diet, diet plus 80 mg of fluvastatin and diet plus fluvastatin 80 mg and 4 g of prescription omega 3 fatty acids. The intestinal lipoproteins were quantified by the fasting concentration of apolipoprotein B48 using a commercial ELISA.
Results
The addition of 4 g of prescription omega 3 was followed by significant reductions in the levels of triglycerides, VLDL triglycerides and the triglyceride/HDL cholesterol ratio, and an increase in HDL cholesterol (P < 0.05). Fluvastatin induced a reduction of 26% in B100 (P < 0.05) and 14% in B48 (NS). However, the addition of omega 3 fatty acids enhanced this reduction to 32% in B100 (NS) and up to 36% in B48 (P < 0.05).
Conclusion
Our preliminary findings therefore suggest an additional benefit on postprandial atherogenic particles when omega 3 fatty acids are added to standard treatment with fluvastatin.
Type 2 diabetes is characterized by hypertriglyceridemia, low concentrations of HDL cholesterol, increased small-dense LDL (sdLDL), greater postprandial lipidemia and a considerable increase in vascular risk
Omega 3 EPA specifically is key in the treatment of hypertryglyceridemia

boosting omega-3 intake through diet or supplements might be a safer way to improve insulin sensitivity in patients with diabetes or pre-diabetes as well as helping to prevent retinopathy a major form of blindness

Wednesday, July 13th, 2011

Omega-3 fatty acids -fats commonly found in fish oil specifically EPA and DHA — were shown several years ago to prevent retinopathy, a major form of blindness, in a mouse model of the disease. A follow-up study, from the same research team at Children’s Hospital Boston, now reveals exactly how omega-3’s provide protection, and provides reassurance that widely used COX-inhibiting drugs like aspirin and NSAIDs don’t negate their benefit.
The findings, published in the February 9th issue of Science Translational Medicine, also suggest that omega-3’s may be beneficial in diabetes.
Retinopathy — an eye disease caused by the proliferation of tortuous, leaky blood vessels in the retina — is a leading cause of blindness, affecting 4.1 million Americans with diabetes (a number expected to double over the next 15 years) and many premature infants. Another 7 million-plus Americans have age-related macular degeneration (AMD); this too will increase as the population ages. The most common “wet” form of AMD is also caused by abnormal blood vessel growth.
The ability to prevent these “neovascular” eye diseases with omega-3 fatty acids could provide tremendous cost savings, says Children’s ophthalmologist Lois Smith, MD, PhD, senior investigator on the study. “The cost of omega-3 supplementation is about $10 a month, versus up to $4,000 a month for anti-VEGF therapy,” she says, referring to drugs such as Macugen and Lucentis used in AMD and diabetic retinopathy. “Our new findings give us new information on how omega-3s work that makes them an even more promising option.”
Omega-3 fatty acids, highly concentrated in the retina, are often lacking in Western diets, which tend to be higher in omega-6 fatty acids. In Smith’s previous study, mice fed diets rich in omega-3 fatty acids by Smith’s team had nearly 50 percent less pathologic vessel growth in the retina than mice fed omega-6-rich diets. Smith and colleagues further showed that the omega-3 diet decreased inflammatory messaging in the eye.
In the new study, they document another protective mechanism: a direct effect on blood vessel growth (angiogenesis) that selectively promotes the growth of healthy blood vessels and inhibits the growth of abnormal vessels.
In addition, Smith and colleagues isolated the specific compound from omega-3 fatty acids that has these beneficial effects in mice (a metabolite of the omega-3 fatty acid DHA, known as 4-HDHA), and the enzyme that produces it (5-lipoxygenase, or 5-LOX). They showed that COX enzymes are not involved in omega-3 breakdown, suggesting that aspirin and NSAIDs — taken by millions of Americans — will not interfere with omega-3 benefits.
“This is important for people with diabetes, who often take aspirin to prevent heart disease, and also for elderly people with AMD who have a propensity for heart disease,” says Smith. (One drug used for asthma, zileuton, does interfere with 5-LOX, however.)
Finally, the study demonstrated that 5-LOX acts by activating the PPAR-gamma receptor, the same receptor targeted by “glitazone” drugs such as Avandia, taken by patients with type 2 diabetes to increase their sensitivity to insulin. Since these drugs also increase the risk for heart disease, boosting omega-3 intake through diet or supplements might be a safer way to improve insulin sensitivity in patients with diabetes or pre-diabetes. “There needs to be a good clinical study in diabetes,” Smith says.
Smith works closely with principal investigators at the National Eye Institute who are conducting an ongoing multicenter trial of omega-3 supplements in patients with AMD, known as AREDS2. The trial will continue until 2013. An earlier retrospective study, AREDS1, found higher self-reported intake of fish to be associated with a lower likelihood of AMD.
In addition, Smith is collaborating with a group in Sweden that is conducting a clinical trial of omega-3 fatty acids in premature infants, who are often deficient in omega-3. That study will measure infants’ blood levels of omega-3 products and follow the infants to see if they develop retinopathy. If results are promising Smith will seek FDA approval to conduct a clinical trial in premature infants at Children’s.
Meanwhile, in her lab work, Smith plans to continue seeking beneficial lipid pathways, while looking for the most harmful omega 6 metabolites. “We found the good guys, now we’ll look for the bad ones,” says Smith. “If we find the pathways, maybe we can selectively block the bad metabolites. We would hope to start with drugs that are already available.”
Przemyslaw Sapieha and Andreas Stahl in Smith’s lab were co-first authors on the study. Funders include the National Eye Institute, the Children’s Hospital Boston Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Center, Research to Prevent Blindness, the Alcon Research Institute, MacTel Foundation, the Roche Foundation for Anemia Research and the V. Kann Rasmussen Foundation.

Omega 3 fish oil EPA Slows Progress of Atherosclerosis in Diabetic Patients

Tuesday, July 12th, 2011

EPA Slows Progress of Atherosclerosis in Diabetic Patients

People with type 2 diabetes are more likely to develop heart disease, circulatory problems and damaged organs than people without the condition. Impaired blood circulation, particularly in the small blood vessels, contributes to damaged eyes, kidneys and feet. Thus, in caring for diabetic patients, doctors pay close attention to blood circulation. To date, there are not many ways of improving the damaged blood vessels that develop in atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes.

The fatty acids in fish oils, known as long-chain omega-3s, are known to improve blood vessel function in patients with heart disease. They relax the muscles in the blood vessel walls, reduce inflammation and lower blood clotting. These properties make them good candidates for improving blood vessel function in type 2 diabetics. Accordingly, a team of Japanese investigators examined the effect of consuming nearly 2 g/day of EPA, on the thickness of the carotid artery wall in diabetic patients. EPA is one of the major long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil. This dose is about the equivalent of 2 servings of salmon/day. Study participants consumed the omega-3 supplements for 2 years. Patients who were given standard medical treatment, but no supplements, were used for comparison.

At the end of the study, patients consuming EPA had a significant decrease of 4.7% in the thickness of their carotid wall compared with an increase of 2.4% in patients receiving standard care. Measurements of blood flow also improved in the EPA patients. There was a small increase in glycosylated hemoglobin, a sensitive measure of elevated blood glucose, in the EPA group and a decrease in the control patients. While this outcome was undesirable, such values in individual patients would call for aggressive patient management. This finding indicates that diabetic patients who consume large amounts of fish oil should be regularly monitored by their doctors for blood glucose control. With regular check-ups, diabetic patients can obtain the heart and circulatory system benefits of fish oil without compromising their diabetes status. Overall, this study adds to the growing evidence that long-chain omega-3 fatty acids may slow the progression of atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes or coronary artery disease.

Omega-3-rich supplements may improve blood lipid levels of people with metabolic syndrome

Tuesday, March 8th, 2011

Omega-3-rich supplements may improve blood lipid levels of people with metabolic syndrome, reducing the risks of developing serious health problems, says a new study.

The research, published in The Journal of Nutrition, suggests that the effects of metabolic syndrome– a major risk factor for insulin resistance and diabetes – can be reduced through the addition of omega 3 fatty acids in low-fat, high-complex carbohydrate diets.

“Fish oil supplements correct many metabolic alterations associated with insulin resistance, including reduced postprandial plasma triglyceride concentration” stated the researchers, led by Jose Lopez-Miranda from the University of Cordoba, Spain.

Risk factors

Metabolic syndrome is the name given to a group of risk factors that frequently include obesity, hypertension, high levels of blood lipids, and high blood sugars.

The condition is a common precursor to type II diabetes, and is also strongly associated with increased risk of major health problems such as heart disease and stroke.

The causes of metabolic syndrome are unknown, although they are thought to involve both genetic and environmental factors – including poor diet.

One way to increase the overall health – and reduce the risks – of people with metabolic syndrome, has been to eat a diet low in saturated fat and high in complex carbohydrates. However, previous research has suggested that this diet does not help to reduce high levels of blood lipids – with some studies observing such a diet could even be raising blood lipid levels.

Positive effects

The new study looked into the effects of four different diet combinations on blood lipid metabolism, in 117 patients with metabolic syndrome.

In accordance with previous suggestions, the researchers found that a low-fat, high-complex carbohydrate diet had “several detrimental effects”, including significantly increasing total triglyceride levels, and triglyceride rich lipoprotein cholesterol levels.

In contrast, intake of the same diet supplemented with omega-3 was found to have no effects on blood lipid levels, with researchers observing that a diet rich in monounsaturated fats, or a low-fat diet rich in complex carbohydrates and omega-3 fatty acids, resulted in lower circulating blood lipid levels than a diet rich in high saturated fats or a diet low in fats and high in complex carbohydrates.

The data from the study suggest a place for higher omega-3 intake in people with metabolic syndrome, and supports previous research that suggests monounsaturated fatty acids can have a positive effect on blood lipid levels.

“The long-term effect of the low-fat, high-complex carbohydrate diet, pre vs. post intervention phases, showed several beneficial effects of long chain omega-3 PUFA supplementation,” stated the researchers.

“Our data suggest that long-term intake of an isocaloric, low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet supplemented with long chain omega-3 … have beneficial effects on postprandial lipoprotein response in patients with metabolic syndrome,”

Source: The Journal of Nutrition
Published online ahead of print, doi:10.3945/jn.109.120816
“A Low-Fat, High-Complex Carbohydrate Diet Supplemented with Long-Chain (n-3) Fatty Acids Alters the Postprandial Lipoprotein Profile in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome”
Authors: Y. Jimenez-Gomez, C. Marin, P. Perez-Martinez, et al

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