Posts Tagged ‘natural therapy for depression’

High omega3 fish oil EPA formulation shows a decrease in Major Depressive Disorder when augmenting treatment with Citalopram

Wednesday, January 25th, 2012

High omega3 fish oil EPA formulation shows a decrease in Major Depressive Disorder when augmenting treatment with Citalopram –

TakeOmega3 has 750 mg EPA and 50mg DHA , previous research has shown that low levels of DHA ie 6% is key to successful treatment with regards mental health disorders

Omega 3 Fatty Acid Augment Citalopram for Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

Gertsik L, Poland R, Bresee C, et al.
Omega 3 Fatty Acid Augmentation of Citalopram Treatment for Patients With Major Depressive Disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology: February 2012
Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the efficacy of combination therapy with citalopram plus omega 3 fatty acid( sourced from fish oil )fatty acids versus citalopram plus placebo (olive oil) in the initial treatment of individuals with major depressive disorder MDD hypothesized that combination therapy would lead not only to greater efficacy but also to a more rapid onset of therapeutic response.

Methods: Forty-two subjects participated in this 9-week randomized, masked, placebo-controlled study of combination therapy 900 mg of eicosapentaenoic acid, 200 mg of and docosahexaenoic acid, and 100 mg of other omega-3 fatty acids per two capsules administered twice daily plus citalopram) versus monotherapy (two 1 g capsules of olive oil per day plus citalopram) treatment of MDD. 4 capsules of omega3 in total was taken daily

Results: The combination therapy demonstrated significantly greater improvement in Hamilton Depression Rating scale scores over time (F = 7.32; df 1,177; P = 0.008) beginning at week 4 (t = −2.48; df 177; P = 0.014).

Conclusions: Combination therapy was more effective than monotherapy in decreasing signs and symptoms of MDD during the 8 weeks of active treatment; however, combination therapy did not seem to enhance the speed of the initial antidepressant response. These findings suggest that there may be an advantage to combining omega-3 fatty acids with a selective serotonin uptake inhibitor in the initial treatment of individuals with MDD. A larger definitive study is warranted

Treatment of depression with omega3 – encouraging results from largest clinical study

Monday, November 15th, 2010

The study was published in the online Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.This was the largest study ever conducted assessing Omega-3’s efficacy in treating major depression. It was carried out in conjunction with researchers from centres affiliated with the UdM’s Réseau universitaire intégré de santé (RUIS), from McGill University, Université Laval in Quebec City and Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. The study was supported by the European the Fondation du CHUM and the CRCHUM.

Initial analyses failed to clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of Omega-3 for all patients taking part in the study. Other analyses, however, revealed that Omega-3 improved depression symptoms in patients diagnosed with depression unaccompanied by an anxiety disorder. Efficacy for these patients was comparable to that generally observed with conventional antidepressant treatment.From October 2005 to January 2009, 432 male and female participants with major unipolar depression were recruited to take part in this randomized, double-blind study (neither patients nor researchers knew which capsules patients received). For eight weeks, half of the participants took three capsules per day of a fish oil supplement containing high concentrations of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). The other half took three identical capsules of a placebo consisting of sunflower oil, flavoured with a small quantity of fish oil. In contrast with typical clinical studies designed to assess the effectiveness of antidepressants, this study included a high proportion of patients with complex and difficult-to-treat conditions, including patients resistant to conventional antidepressant treatments and patients also suffering from an anxiety disorder. The aim was to assess the value of Omega-3 supplementation in a group of individuals more like those treated in outpatient clinics.Some 11% of men and 16% of women in Canada will suffer from major depression at some point in their lives, making this disorder one of our society’s leading public health issues. Depression, which is now the world’s fourth leading cause of morbidity and death is expected to move up to the number two position by 2020. “Despite significant progress in neuroscience over the past two decades, depression is difficult to treat,” Dr. Lespérance noted. In view of the large number of patients who stop taking their medications in the first few months of treatment and those who refuse such treatment due to fear of stigmatization or side effects, it comes as no surprise that a large number of patients suffering from major depression use alternative treatments offered outside the healthcare system. “Many of these treatments have not been adequately evaluated. That is why it was important to assess the efficacy of Omega-3, one of the most popular alternative approaches,” he added.It is important to note that the study assessed use of Omega-3 for eight weeks, at doses of 1050 mg of EPA and 150 mg of DHA each day. It is currently unknown whether taking higher doses or taking supplements over a longer period would yield different results.

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