Posts Tagged ‘natural alternatives to anti depressants’

Omega 3 Fish Oil EPA and DHA reduce anxiety and inflammation in healthy students

Thursday, July 14th, 2011

Omega-3 Reduces Anxiety and Inflammation in Healthy Students,
A new study gauging the impact of consuming more fish oil showed a marked reduction both in inflammation and, surprisingly, in anxiety among a cohort of healthy young people.

The findings suggest that if young participants can get such improvements from specific dietary supplements, then the elderly and people at high risk for certain diseases might benefit even more.
The findings by a team of researchers at Ohio State University were just published in the journal Brain, Behavior and Immunity. It is the latest from more than three decades of research into links between psychological stress and immunity.
Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), have long been considered as positive additives to the diet. Earlier research suggested that the compounds might play a role in reducing the level of cytokines in the body, compounds that promote inflammation, and perhaps even reduce depression.
Psychological stress has repeatedly been shown to increase cytokine production so the researchers wondered if increasing omega-3 might mitigate that process, reducing inflammation.
To test their theory, they turned to a familiar group of research subjects — medical students. Some of the earliest work these scientists did showed that stress from important medical school tests lowered students’ immune status.
“We hypothesized that giving some students omega-3 supplements would decrease their production of proinflammatory cytokines, compared to other students who only received a placebo,” explained Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, professor of psychology and psychiatry.
“We thought the omega-3 would reduce the stress-induced increase in cytokines that normally arose from nervousness over the tests.”
The team assembled a field of 68 first- and second-year medical students who volunteered for the clinical trial. The students were randomly divided into six groups, all of which were interviewed six times during the study. At each visit, blood samples were drawn from the students who also completed a battery of psychological surveys intended to gauge their levels of stress, anxiety or depression. The students also completed questionnaires about their diets during the previous weeks.
Half the students received omega-3 supplements while the other half were given placebo pills.
“The supplement was probably about four or five times the amount of fish oil you’d get from a daily serving of salmon, for example,” explained Martha Belury, professor of human nutrition and co-author in the study.
Part of the study, however, didn’t go according to plans.
Changes in the medical curriculum and the distribution of major tests throughout the year, rather than during a tense three-day period as was done in the past, removed much of the stress that medical students had shown in past studies.
“These students were not anxious. They weren’t really stressed. They were actually sleeping well throughout this period, so we didn’t get the stress effect we had expected,” Kiecolt-Glaser said.
But the psychological surveys clearly showed an important change in anxiety among the students: Those receiving the omega-3 showed a 20 percent reduction in anxiety compared to the placebo group.
An analysis of the of the blood samples from the medical students showed similar important results.
“We took measurements of the cytokines in the blood serum, as well as measured the productivity of cells that produced two important cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa),” said Ron Glaser, professor of molecular virology, immunology & medical genetics and director of the Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research.
“We saw a 14 percent reduction in the amounts of IL-6 among the students receiving the omega-3.” Since the cytokines foster inflammation, “anything we can do to reduce cytokines is a big plus in dealing with the overall health of people at risk for many diseases,” he said.
While inflammation is a natural immune response that helps the body heal, it also can play a harmful role in a host of diseases ranging from arthritis to heart disease to cancer.

EPA omega 3 fish oil Improves Symptoms in Patients with Bipolar Disorder

Tuesday, July 12th, 2011

study from the Institute of Psychiatry in London reported encouraging results from a randomized controlled trial of EPA in 75 patients with bipolar disorder. Published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, the study found that the consumption of 1 or 2 grams of EPA daily for 3 months resulted in significant clinical improvements, notably in reduced depression. It is usually the gloomy depression phase of the illness that is most difficult to manage. Hence, improvement in this condition offers considerable hope to people afflicted by it. There was no difference between taking 1 or 2 grams of EPA, so the lower amount supports other reports of benefits with 1 gram of EPA daily.

It should be noted that patients continued with their current medications throughout the study. In addition to the observed improvements, treatment with EPA was without serious side effects, an important factor, as most drug therapies have unwelcome side effects.
studies in people with bipolar disorder have reported significant improvements in mood with the consumption of fish oil or supplements of EPA, a marine omega-3 fatty acid. These studies indicate that EPA rather than DHA, another marine omega-3, appears to be the most effective. Even better, the amounts associated with clinical improvements are relatively low (1 to 2 grams/day).
On a worldwide basis, bipolar disorder and depression are significantly more common in countries where fish consumption is low.

Omega3 fish oil EPA as effective as Prozac in the treatment of medium to major depression

Sunday, July 10th, 2011

EPA Plus Prozac Better Than Either Treatment Alone for Major Depression

Long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFAs) have been used as an adjunct therapy in treating patients with major depressive disorder with mixed, but often encouraging, results. A meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials concluded that n-3 PUFAs have significant antidepressant effects, but there are insufficient data to distinguish whether combined treatment with the two major n-3 LC-PUFAs in fish oils, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), or each fatty acid given individually provides greater benefit. Studies have tended to find positive results with EPA rather than DHA and a rationale for this observation has been suggested. In most, if not all, trials to date, n-3 LC-PUFAs have been provided in conjunction with current antidepressant medications. Difficulties with patient compliance, unwanted or adverse side effects of medications and resistance to treatment make treating depression especially challenging.

In this study, Shima Jazayeri and colleagues at the Tehran University of Medical Sciences in Iran sought to evaluate the effectiveness of fluoxetine (Prozac), EPA or a combination of them in patients with major depressive disorder as indicated by Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores of 15 or greater. Patients did not have other psychiatric disorders or any other significant medical problems or substance abuse. They were not taking n-3 PUFA supplements nor eating more than one serving of fish/week. All participants were free of medication for at least 6 weeks prior to enrolment.

Sixty patients were recruited from referrals to the Roozbeh Psychiatric Hospital in Tehran and randomized to consume 20 mg of fluoxetine or 1 g EPA or a combination daily for 8 weeks. Each participant consumed either a fluoxetine placebo or a rapeseed oil placebo to mimic the type of capsules taken in each group. No placebo-only group was included for ethical reasons. Patients were assessed by the Hamilton Scales at baseline and every 2 weeks thereafter. Of the 60 patients enrolled, 48 completed at least 4 weeks of the study.

Over the course of the 8-week study, all patient groups exhibited significant reductions in their Hamilton depression scores as early as 2 weeks from baseline. Scores for patients treated with fluoxetine or EPA did not differ throughout the study. At 4 and 6 weeks, those consuming both EPA and fluoxetine showed a significantly greater improvement in their Hamilton ratings (as determined by analysis of covariance) compared with either treatment alone. Depression scores continued to improve from the 4th to the 8th week. Response rates for achieving at least a 50% reduction in depression score were 50% for fluoxetine, 56% for EPA and 81% for those taking both fluoxetine and EPA. More adverse events occurred in the fluoxetine and combination groups than in the EPA group and ranged from gastro-intestinal effects, anxiety and decreased appetite to single reports of tremor, nightmare and constipation.

These results suggest a greater improvement in depression with the combination of EPA and fluoxetine, but the effects of either one alone may have been no different from a placebo, had there been one. Other studies have reported a placebo effect of trial participation. This study supports those that have reported significant improvement in depression using a modest dose (1 g/day) of EPA as an adjunct treatment to current medication.

Jazayeri S, Tehrani-Doost M, Keshavarz SA, Hosseini M, Djazayery A, Amini H, Jalali M, Peet M. Comparison of therapeutic effects of omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid and fluoxetine, separately and in combination, in major depressive disorder. Aust N Z J Psychiatry 2008;42:192-198. [PubMed]

Omega 3 is the best natural alternatives to anti depressants and natural adhd remedy

Thursday, June 30th, 2011

Professor Tom Saldeen of Harvard Medical School recommends a diet high in omega-3 to fight depression. Saldeen’s 45 years of research has found that low concentrations of serotonin in the brain almost always correlate to low blood levels of omega-3. Recent studies have found that 1000mg EPA is as effective as Prozac in the treatment of medium to severe depression . The highest concentration of EPA per capsule is found in TakeOmega3 – this product is used and recommended in hospitals and private clinics .TakeOmega3 is recommended by NHS facilities such as Forth Valley Healthboard and leading clinics such as Priory Roehampton. It is used for a number of mental health conditions as well as behavioural / developmental  conditions such as autism , ADHD . With regards ADHD  EPA improves concentration levels , better academic performance as well as positive changes with regards behavioural problems .Parents have commented to us on the drastic changes in their childrens behaviour – from simple things such as the child being able to focus on doing a jigsaw puzzle , or sit quietly to listed to a story being read to a reduction in temper tantrums , agressive outbursts and emotional upset . The capsule can be pricked and added to a childs yoghurt or milk if they are unable to swallow capsules , it can also be added to salad dressings . Please contact us directly if you want specific information with regards treatment of ADHD .Parents very often would rather use herbal adhd treatment , alternative adhd remedy is often preferred to ritalin .

This evidence is backed by Dr Andrew Stoll, best-selling author of The Omega-3 Connection. Stoll was responsible for the publication of the first, scientifically rigorous clinical trial on omega-3 fats in psychiatry. Stoll’s patients with bipolar disorder experienced an improvement in mood stabilisation over a four-month trial period, while the placebo group experienced no change.

Mood and activity in the brain is dependent upon a series of chemical signals that cross each membrane with the help of neurotransmitters. This intricate process is referred to as transduction — sort of like a messaging service or a call centre. Now that we know omega-3 fats are a core component in every cell membrane, they are deemed crucial for signal transduction

Omega 3 Fish Oil and Depression , Mental Health as used in NHS

Monday, March 21st, 2011

Recent studies have shown that 1000mg EPA  omega 3 fish oil is as effective as Prozac in the treatment of medium to severe depression . When used together with the anti depressant it was even more effective than either treatment separately .
Forth Valley HealthBoard  recommend the brand takeomega 3  fish oil both as an adjunctive and primary therapy in medium to severe depression as well as other mental health disorders such as PTSD, OCD .
The reason they use and recommend Takeomega 3 fish oil  is primarily due to the fact this is the highest concentration currently available at just under 90% it also offers 750mg EPA per capsule with minimal quantities of DHA . The product is also manufactured in MHRA licensed facilities .

Forth Valley HealthBoard  Omega 3 Fish Oil Depression

Researchers confirm EPA is powerful natural antidepressant Takeomega3 750mg EPA

Tuesday, March 15th, 2011

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have confirmed that omega-3 fatty acids exhibit powerful antidepressant and brain boosting benefits that have not received the high level of attention they deserve. The team, led by Dr. John M. Davis, discovered that eicosapentenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) — two types of omega-3 fatty acids recognized for their powerful nutritional benefits — are effective enough at improving mood that they may potentially eliminate the need for many people to take antidepressant drugs.

The researchers analyzed 15 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies about omega-3s and found that taking either EPA alone or EPA together with DHA helps to alleviate depression symptoms And since DHA alone did not exhibit antidepressant benefits, the team has identified EPA as the primary active compound in improving mental health.

“Our analysis clarifies the precise type of omega-3 fatty acid that is effective for people with depression and explains why previous findings have been contradictory,” explained Davis. “The EPA predominant formulation is necessary for the therapeutic action to occur.”

People who are deficient in omega-3s are more likely to experience depression than people have consume adequate amounts. Davis and his team found in a previous study that pregnant women deficient in omega-3s are more prone to depression during and after pregnancy than those who get enough of it.
Take Omega 3 has 750 mg of the key active omega3 EPA per capsule as a result it is a true one per day dose as its 85% concentrate. Consumers should be aware that just because a product states it 1000mg omega 3 it may infact have very low levels of omega 3

Treatment of depression with omega3 – encouraging results from largest clinical study

Monday, November 15th, 2010

The study was published in the online Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.This was the largest study ever conducted assessing Omega-3’s efficacy in treating major depression. It was carried out in conjunction with researchers from centres affiliated with the UdM’s Réseau universitaire intégré de santé (RUIS), from McGill University, Université Laval in Quebec City and Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. The study was supported by the European the Fondation du CHUM and the CRCHUM.

Initial analyses failed to clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of Omega-3 for all patients taking part in the study. Other analyses, however, revealed that Omega-3 improved depression symptoms in patients diagnosed with depression unaccompanied by an anxiety disorder. Efficacy for these patients was comparable to that generally observed with conventional antidepressant treatment.From October 2005 to January 2009, 432 male and female participants with major unipolar depression were recruited to take part in this randomized, double-blind study (neither patients nor researchers knew which capsules patients received). For eight weeks, half of the participants took three capsules per day of a fish oil supplement containing high concentrations of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). The other half took three identical capsules of a placebo consisting of sunflower oil, flavoured with a small quantity of fish oil. In contrast with typical clinical studies designed to assess the effectiveness of antidepressants, this study included a high proportion of patients with complex and difficult-to-treat conditions, including patients resistant to conventional antidepressant treatments and patients also suffering from an anxiety disorder. The aim was to assess the value of Omega-3 supplementation in a group of individuals more like those treated in outpatient clinics.Some 11% of men and 16% of women in Canada will suffer from major depression at some point in their lives, making this disorder one of our society’s leading public health issues. Depression, which is now the world’s fourth leading cause of morbidity and death is expected to move up to the number two position by 2020. “Despite significant progress in neuroscience over the past two decades, depression is difficult to treat,” Dr. Lespérance noted. In view of the large number of patients who stop taking their medications in the first few months of treatment and those who refuse such treatment due to fear of stigmatization or side effects, it comes as no surprise that a large number of patients suffering from major depression use alternative treatments offered outside the healthcare system. “Many of these treatments have not been adequately evaluated. That is why it was important to assess the efficacy of Omega-3, one of the most popular alternative approaches,” he added.It is important to note that the study assessed use of Omega-3 for eight weeks, at doses of 1050 mg of EPA and 150 mg of DHA each day. It is currently unknown whether taking higher doses or taking supplements over a longer period would yield different results.

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