Posts Tagged ‘Forth Valley Healthboard fish oil depression omega 3’

Meta-analysis of the effects of omega 3 fish oil eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in clinical trials in depression.

Wednesday, October 5th, 2011

J Clin Psychiatry. 2011 Sep 6.
Meta-analysis of the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in clinical trials in depression.
Sublette ME, Ellis SP, Geant AL, Mann JJ.
Source
New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 42, New York, NY, USA. 10032 es2316@columbia.edu.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:
Randomized trials of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) treatment for depression have differed in outcome. Recent meta-analyses ascribe discrepancies to differential effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) versus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and to diagnostic heterogeneity. This meta-analysis tests the hypothesis that EPA is the effective component in PUFA treatment of major depressive episodes.

DATA SOURCES:
PubMed/MeSH was searched for studies published in English from 1960 through June 2010 using the terms fish oils (MeSH) AND (depressive disorder [MeSH] OR bipolar depression) AND randomized controlled trial (publication type). The search was supplemented by manual bibliography review and examination of relevant review articles.

STUDY SELECTION:
The search yielded 15 trials involving 916 participants. Studies were included if they had a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study design; if depressive episode was the primary complaint (with or without comorbid medical conditions); if omega-3 PUFA supplements were administered; and if appropriate outcome measures were used to assess depressed mood.

DATA EXTRACTION:
Extracted data included study design, sample sizes, doses and percentages of EPA and DHA, mean ages, baseline and endpoint depression ratings and standard deviations for PUFA and placebo groups, and P values. The clinical outcome of interest was the standardized mean difference in the change from baseline to endpoint scores on a depression rating scale in subjects taking PUFA supplements versus subjects taking placebo.

DATA SYNTHESIS:
In a mixed-effect model, percentage of EPA in the supplements was the fixed-effect predictor, dichotomized into 2 groups: EPA < 60% or EPA ≥ 60% of the total EPA + DHA. Secondary analyses explored the relevance of treatment duration, age, and EPA dose.

RESULTS:
Supplements with EPA ≥ 60% showed benefit on standardized mean depression scores (effect size = 0.532; 95% CI, 0.277-0.733; t = 4.195; P < .001) versus supplements with EPA < 60% (effect size = -0.026; 95% CI, -0.200 to 0.148; t = -0.316; P = .756), with negligible contribution of random effects or heteroscedasticity and with no effects of treatment duration or age. Supplements with EPA < 60% were ineffective. Exploratory analyses supported a nonlinear model, with improvement determined by the dose of EPA in excess of DHA, within the range of 200 to 2,200 mg/d of EPA.

CONCLUSIONS:
Supplements containing EPA ≥ 60% of total EPA + DHA, in a dose range of 200 to 2,200 mg/d of EPA in excess of DHA, were effective against primary depression. Translational studies are needed to determine the mechanisms of EPA’s therapeutic benefit.

Long-Chain Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficiency in Mood Disorders: Rationale for Treatment and Prevention.

Saturday, September 10th, 2011

Source

Department of Psychiatry, Division of Bipolar Disorders Research, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45219-0516, USA. robert.mcnamara@uc.edu.

Abstract

Major recurrent mood disorders including major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) are associated with significant psychosocial morbidity and excess premature mortality primarily attributable to suicide and coronary heart disease. Limited efficacy and adverse side-effects associated with psychotropic medications used in the treatment of MDD and BD highlight the urgent need to develop safe and efficacious treatments or treatment adjuncts. A body of evidence now indicates that long-chain omega-3 (LCn-3) fatty acid deficiency is a feature associated with MDD and BD. The etiology of LCn-3 deficits in MDD and BD patients may be attributable to both genetic and environmental factors. Dietary LCn-3 supplementation is safe and well-tolerated with chronic administration and corrects LCn-3 deficiency in MDD and BD patients. LCn-3 supplementation has been found to augment the therapeutic efficacy of psychotropic medications in the treatment of mood symptoms and to reduce suicidality. Preliminary studies also suggest that LCn-3 supplementation is efficacious as monotherapy in the treatment and prevention of psychopathology in children and adolescents. LCn-3 supplementation may also be associated with reduced risk for developing coronary heart disease. The overall cost-benefit ratio associated with LCn-3 supplementation provides a strong rationale to diagnose and treat LCn-3 deficiency in MDD and BD patients, and to prevent LCn-3 deficiency in subjects at high risk for developing these disorders.

Omega 3 Fish Oil and Depression , Mental Health as used in NHS

Monday, March 21st, 2011

Recent studies have shown that 1000mg EPA  omega 3 fish oil is as effective as Prozac in the treatment of medium to severe depression . When used together with the anti depressant it was even more effective than either treatment separately .
Forth Valley HealthBoard  recommend the brand takeomega 3  fish oil both as an adjunctive and primary therapy in medium to severe depression as well as other mental health disorders such as PTSD, OCD .
The reason they use and recommend Takeomega 3 fish oil  is primarily due to the fact this is the highest concentration currently available at just under 90% it also offers 750mg EPA per capsule with minimal quantities of DHA . The product is also manufactured in MHRA licensed facilities .

Forth Valley HealthBoard  Omega 3 Fish Oil Depression

Great Britain Flag
Made in the UK - Take Omega 3 Suspendisse lacinia ultricies justo, at ultricies nisi tempus ac. Cras sed vehicula metus. Phasellus...