Posts Tagged ‘fish oil benefits’

Omega 3 Fish Oil EPA and DHA reduce anxiety and inflammation in healthy students

Thursday, July 14th, 2011

Omega-3 Reduces Anxiety and Inflammation in Healthy Students,
A new study gauging the impact of consuming more fish oil showed a marked reduction both in inflammation and, surprisingly, in anxiety among a cohort of healthy young people.

The findings suggest that if young participants can get such improvements from specific dietary supplements, then the elderly and people at high risk for certain diseases might benefit even more.
The findings by a team of researchers at Ohio State University were just published in the journal Brain, Behavior and Immunity. It is the latest from more than three decades of research into links between psychological stress and immunity.
Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), have long been considered as positive additives to the diet. Earlier research suggested that the compounds might play a role in reducing the level of cytokines in the body, compounds that promote inflammation, and perhaps even reduce depression.
Psychological stress has repeatedly been shown to increase cytokine production so the researchers wondered if increasing omega-3 might mitigate that process, reducing inflammation.
To test their theory, they turned to a familiar group of research subjects — medical students. Some of the earliest work these scientists did showed that stress from important medical school tests lowered students’ immune status.
“We hypothesized that giving some students omega-3 supplements would decrease their production of proinflammatory cytokines, compared to other students who only received a placebo,” explained Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, professor of psychology and psychiatry.
“We thought the omega-3 would reduce the stress-induced increase in cytokines that normally arose from nervousness over the tests.”
The team assembled a field of 68 first- and second-year medical students who volunteered for the clinical trial. The students were randomly divided into six groups, all of which were interviewed six times during the study. At each visit, blood samples were drawn from the students who also completed a battery of psychological surveys intended to gauge their levels of stress, anxiety or depression. The students also completed questionnaires about their diets during the previous weeks.
Half the students received omega-3 supplements while the other half were given placebo pills.
“The supplement was probably about four or five times the amount of fish oil you’d get from a daily serving of salmon, for example,” explained Martha Belury, professor of human nutrition and co-author in the study.
Part of the study, however, didn’t go according to plans.
Changes in the medical curriculum and the distribution of major tests throughout the year, rather than during a tense three-day period as was done in the past, removed much of the stress that medical students had shown in past studies.
“These students were not anxious. They weren’t really stressed. They were actually sleeping well throughout this period, so we didn’t get the stress effect we had expected,” Kiecolt-Glaser said.
But the psychological surveys clearly showed an important change in anxiety among the students: Those receiving the omega-3 showed a 20 percent reduction in anxiety compared to the placebo group.
An analysis of the of the blood samples from the medical students showed similar important results.
“We took measurements of the cytokines in the blood serum, as well as measured the productivity of cells that produced two important cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa),” said Ron Glaser, professor of molecular virology, immunology & medical genetics and director of the Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research.
“We saw a 14 percent reduction in the amounts of IL-6 among the students receiving the omega-3.” Since the cytokines foster inflammation, “anything we can do to reduce cytokines is a big plus in dealing with the overall health of people at risk for many diseases,” he said.
While inflammation is a natural immune response that helps the body heal, it also can play a harmful role in a host of diseases ranging from arthritis to heart disease to cancer.

Side Effects Fish Oil

Friday, April 15th, 2011

People are often concerned about the side effects of fish oil . As with any supplement there is always the chance of suffering side effects however the best way to avoid side effects with fish oil is very simple.

Buy a good quality fish oil supplement that is highly purified , this should mean that you avoid the fishy aftertaste and gastric / stomach upset that can be linked with lower grade fish oil . Unfortunately it isnt always clear how pure a product is, but a good guideline is to look at the omega3 content per fish oil supplement and then see what the level of the active ingredients EPA and DHA are in percentage to the total omega 3 fish oil. For example a product may detail it is 1000mg omega 3 fish oil however the level of  active ingredients EPA and DHA may only be 300mg – so less than a 1/3 of the  total oil contains the important EPA /DHA  so this is clearly a low concentration oil which has not been refined to the extent of a high quality oil such as takeomega 3 fish oil . A good quality fish oil supplement will detail the exact levels of EPA and DHA per capsule . Take Omega 3 fish oil has per fish oil supplement 750mg EPA and 50mg DHA and is the highest concentration available of any fish oil supplement at 85% concentration.

Do you know where the fish oil has been sourced from ?  What is the testing process throughout manufacturing process ? Where is the country of origin ? All of these should be considered as it is an indication of the purity of the fish oil , and the purity of the fish oil could be critical in avoiding stomach upset , nausea, gastric upset. Take Omega 3 fish oil is uniquely made from fish sourced from sustainable fish stocks from the purest waters of Chile – only sardines and anchovies are used in our fish oil. The refining process takes 10 weeks and is uniquely carried out in only one of two sites globally licensed by MHRA (Medical Health and Regulatory Authority) as a result Take Omega 3 is the highest concentration available . So the fish oil side effects that you may experience with other less refined fish oils due to lack of  purity and low concentration dont occur.

As with any supplement fish oil isnt any different and you should stick to the recommended dosage – we recommend 1 fish oil supplement per day  as that delivers 750mg EPA and 50mg DHA- obviously other  fish oil supplement brands have far lower concentrations and therefore they may recommend you  take multiple capsules. The more low grade omega 3 fish oil  capsules you take the more chance you are likely to have side effects fish oil .

If  you take blood thinners such as warfarin you should consult your Doctor  as omega 3 does have a blood thinning effect . Unlike St Johns Wort omega 3 fish oil does not interact in a negative way with any other prescription medicine so it is safe though you should always advise your GP that you are taking it as with any other vitamin / mineral supplement.

Omega 3 Fish Oil benefits help prevent muscle loss in breast cancer and protects immune system

Tuesday, April 12th, 2011

Fish oil supplements may help prevent muscle loss in breast cancer survivors and help them ward off other chronic diseases, new research from Australia suggests.The study suggests there are clear benefits fish oil supplementation.

Loss of muscle mass shortly after cancer treatment is a common problem for breast cancer survivors.

The problem may be partly due to the presence of chronic inflammation, which causes a breakdown in muscle tissue.

But fish oils interfere with inflammation, thereby reducing its effect.

University of Queensland researcher Cameron McDonald says exercise is effective in rebuilding lost muscle but it’s often hard to maintain over time.

He says muscle loss exposes survivors to the prospect of earlier onset, or exacerbated, obesity-related chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

“If fish oil supplementation is effective in preventing muscle loss before it occurs, or even more effective when used in conjunction with exercise, it could significantly decrease the risk of survivors developing a chronic disease,” the PhD student says.

Research is still in its early stages and clinical trials are set to start later in the year.

Omega3 EPA breakthrough fish oil benefits bowel cancer treatment and prevention

Thursday, March 31st, 2011

In todays Daily Mail an article has stated that more than three quarters of women are living in ignorance of bowel cancer , a cancer that is more prevelant than both ovarian and cervical cancer put together, The study below gives a clear indication that Omega 3 EPA may indeed be a breakthrough treatment , they recommend 2 per day of EPA , TakeOmega3 is a highly purified form of omega3 which has 750 mg EPA per capsule so the patient would be required to take between 2-3 capsules per day of this product .

Diabetes: People with diabetes have a 30% to 40% increased chance of getting colorectal cancer. They also tend to have a higher death rate from this cancer.

A purified form of omega 3 EPA cuts the number and size of precancerous bowel growths (polyps) in people whose genetic make-up predisposes them to bowel cancer, finds research published ahead of print in the journal Gut. Furthermore, this particular omega 3 (eicosapentaenoic acid or EPA) seems to be as effective as the prescription medicine used to treat familial bowel polyps, but without the associated cardiovascular side effects.
The researchers base their findings on 55 patients, all of whom had the inherited genetic mutation that prompts the development of precancerous polyps in the bowel — known as familial adenomatous polyposis, or FAP for short.
People with FAP are at significantly increased risk of developing bowel cancer and require surgery to remove large sections of their bowel. Subsequently, some also need regular monitoring. All 55 patients had previously undergone surgery and were being monitored by endoscopy — a procedure involving a camera on the end of a flexible tube passed through the rectum.
Twenty eight of the patients were randomly assigned to six months of treatment with 2 g daily of a new highly purified form of the omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) EPA. The other 27 were given the same amount of a dummy treatment (placebo).
. Dietary omega 3 PUFA mainly comes from oily fish, such as salmon, mackerel, and herring.
An assessment of the number and size of polyps at the beginning and end of the six month study period revealed significant differences between the two groups of patients. The number of polyps increased by almost 10% among those treated with the placebo, but fell by more than 12% among those treated with the EPA capsules, representing a difference of almost 22.5%.
This was still clinically significant, even after taking account of influential factors, such as age and sex.
Similarly, polyp size increased by more than 17% among those in the placebo group but fell by more than 12.5% in those taking the EPA capsules, representing a difference of just under 30%.
The authors note that the effects of EPA were similar to those produced by celecoxib, which is used to help curb the growth of new and existing polyps in patients with FAP.
The use of celecoxib has been associated with harmful cardiovascular side effects in older patients. In this study, EPA produced few side effects and these were no more common than those produced by the placebo. This formulation of omega 3 might also help to prevent bowel cancer in people with the common non-familial form of bowel polyps, suggest the authors. As omega 3 PUFAs in general are safe and even good for cardiovascular health, Take Omega 3 EPA could be especially suitable for older patients at risk of both bowel cancer and heart disease, they say.

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