Posts Tagged ‘dha’

High strength Omega3 appears to inhibit breast cancer cell growth

Wednesday, January 16th, 2013

Although evidence has shown the regulating effect of n-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) marine sourced omega3 fish oil on cell signaling transduction, it remains unknown whether n-3 PUFA treatment modulates estrogen signaling.

The current study showed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5) shifted the pro-survival and proliferative effect of estrogen to a pro-apoptotic effect in human breast cancer (BCa) MCF-7 and T47D cells. 17 β-estradiol (E2) enhanced the inhibitory effect of n-3 PUFAs on BCa cell growth. The IC50 of DHA or EPA in MCF-7 cells decreased when combined with E2 (10 nM) treatment (from 173 µM for DHA only to 113 µM for DHA+E2, and from 187 µm for EPA only to 130 µm for EPA+E2). E2 also augmented apoptosis in n-3 PUFA-treated BCa cells. In contrast, in cells treated with stearic acid (SA, C18:0) as well as cells not treated with fatty acid, E2 promoted breast cancer cell growth. Classical (nuclear) estrogen receptors may not be involved in the pro-apoptotic effects of E2 on the n-3 PUFA-treated BCa cells because ERα agonist failed to elicit, and ERα knockdown failed to block E2 pro-apoptotic effects. Subsequent studies reveal that G protein coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1) may mediate the pro-apoptotic effect of estrogen. N-3 PUFA treatment initiated the pro-apoptotic signaling of estrogen by increasing GPER1-cAMP-PKA signaling response, and blunting EGFR, Erk 1/2, and AKT activity.

These findings may not only provide the evidence to link n-3 PUFAs omega 3 biologic effects and the pro-apoptotic signaling of estrogen in breast cancer cells, but also shed new insight into the potential application of n-3 PUFAs in Breast Cancer treatment.

Research shows effectiveness of a daily dose 2.5G omega3 re treatment of depression in elderly

Sunday, October 14th, 2012

Abstract Nutrition Journal 2012, 11:82 doi:10.1186/1475-2891-11-82
Background
Depression is one of the most frequently missed diagnoses in elderly people, with obvious
negative effects on quality of life. Various studies have shown that long chain omega-3
polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) may be useful in its management. Our objective was
to evaluate whether a supplement containing n-3 PUFA improves depressive symptoms in
depressed elderly patients, and whether the blood fatty acid pattern is correlated with these
changes.
Methods
The severity of depressive symptoms according to the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS),
blood fatty acid composition and erythrocyte phospholipids were analyzed in 46 depressed
females aged 66-95y, diagnosed with depression according to DSMIV, within the context of
a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. 22 depressed females were included in
the intervention group (2.5 g/day of n-3 PUFA for 8 weeks), and 24 in the placebo group. We
also measured immunological parameters (CD2, CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD19 and
cytokines (IL-5, IL-15).
Results
The mean GDS score and AA/EPA ratio, in whole blood and RBC membrane phospholipids,
were significantly lower after 2 months supplementation with n-3 PUFA. A significant
correlation between the amelioration of GDS and the AA/EPA ratio with some
immunological parameters, such as CD2, CD19, CD4, CD16 and the ratio CD4/CD8, was
also found. Nevertheless, omega-3 supplementation did not significantly improve the studied
immunological functions.
Conclusions
n-3 PUFA supplementation ameliorates symptoms in elderly depression. The n-3 PUFA
status may be monitored by means of the determination of whole blood AA/EPA ratio.

Poor diet during pregnancy increases offspring’s vulnerability to the effects of aging, new research has shown for the first time-Omega 3 are essential for healthy development

Saturday, July 16th, 2011

h, by scientists from the University of Cambridge, provides important insight into why children born to mothers who consumed an unhealthy diet during pregnancy have an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (a significant contributing factor to heart disease and cancer) later in life. Low levels of essential fatty acids can have a major impact , the key omega 3 ’s EPA and DHA are essential as the body needs to take these from diet . Fears of heavy metal contamination are often linked to mothers not wishin to consume adequate levels of fish during pregnancy , the alternative is to take a daily high quality omega3 supplement that provides concentrated levels of EPA and DHA. TakeOmega3 is a true one per day capsule and gives a minimum of 750mg EPA and 50 mg DHA per capsule .Omega 3 fatty acids EPA and DHA are linked to lower incidence of heart disease , protection against risk of Cancer , lower incidence and preventio of type 2 diabetes
“What is most exciting about these findings is that we are now starting to really understand how nutrition during the first nine months of life spent in the womb shape our long term health by influencing how the cells in our body age,” said Dr Susan Ozanne, the senior author on the paper and British Heart Foundation Senior Fellow from the Institute of Metabolic Science at the University of Cambridge.
It is well established that environmental factors interact with genes throughout life, affecting the expression of those genes and, consequently, tissue function and disease risk. Diet during critical periods of development, such as during the nine months in the womb, has been cited as one such environmental factor. Epigenetics, which refers to modifications to the DNA that regulate how much of a gene is produced, has been suggested to underlie these effects.
However, until now, very little was understood about the underlying mechanisms that control the interaction between diet during gestation and gene expression in offspring throughout their adult life. Research, funded by the BBSRC and the British Heart Foundation, has now shown that the gene Hnf4a, which has been linked to type 2 diabetes, is regulated by maternal diet through epigenetic modifications to our DNA. Additionally, they found that poor diet exacerbates the rate at which these key epigenetic modifications accumulate during the aging process.
Previous research has shown that the gene Hnf4a plays an important role both during development of the pancreas and later in the production of insulin. The researchers hypothesised that diet during pregnancy influences the expression of this gene later in life, thereby influencing the risk of diabetes.
To test their theory, the researchers used a well-established rat model where, by altering the protein content of the mother’s diet during pregnancy, the offspring develop type 2 diabetes in old age.
First, they studied the RNA from insulin secreting cells in the pancreas from offspring of normally fed as well as malnourished mothers in young adult life and in old age. When they compared the two, they found that there was a significant decrease in the expression of the Hnf4a gene in the offspring prone to type 2 diabetes. The expression of Hnf4a also decreased with age in both groups.
Second, they studied the DNA and found that the decrease of Hnf4a was caused by epigenetic changes. The age associated epigenetic silencing was more pronounced in rats exposed to poor maternal diet. They concluded that the epigenetic changes resulting from maternal diet and aging lead to the reduced expression of the Hnf4a gene, decreasing the function of the pancreas and therefore its ability to make insulin (and thereby increasing the risk of diabetes).
The scientists then studied the DNA from insulin secreting cells from human pancreases to show that expression of this important gene was controlled in the same way in humans.
“It is remarkable that maternal diet can mark our genes so they remember events in very early life,” said Dr Miguel Constancia, the senior co-author on the paper from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Metabolic Research Laboratories at the University of Cambridge. “Our findings reveal a novel mechanism by which maternal diet and aging interact through epigenetic processes to determine our risk of age-associated diseases.”
Professor Jeremy Pearson, Associate Medical Director at the British Heart Foundation, said: “We already know that a healthy pregnancy is important in shaping a child’s health, and their risk of heart disease as they grow up. The reasons why are not well understood, but this study in rats adds to the evidence that a mother’s diet may sometimes alter the control of certain genes in her unborn child. It’s no reason for expectant mothers to be unduly worried. This research doesn’t change our advice that pregnant women should try to eat a healthy, balanced diet.”
Professor Douglas Kell, Chief Executive, BBSRC said: “Epigenetics is a relatively young field of research with tremendous potential to underpin our understanding of many biological processes in all organisms. The fact that there is a relationship between the biology of a pregnant mother and the long term health of her child has been known for some time but our understanding of the biological processes behind some of the more subtle effects is still at a nascent stage. This study uncovers — through epigenetics and molecular biology research — an important piece of this puzzle and shows us how apparently minor changes within cells at the very earliest stages of development can have a major influence on our health into

Omega 3 Fish Oil benefits help prevent muscle loss in breast cancer and protects immune system

Tuesday, April 12th, 2011

Fish oil supplements may help prevent muscle loss in breast cancer survivors and help them ward off other chronic diseases, new research from Australia suggests.The study suggests there are clear benefits fish oil supplementation.

Loss of muscle mass shortly after cancer treatment is a common problem for breast cancer survivors.

The problem may be partly due to the presence of chronic inflammation, which causes a breakdown in muscle tissue.

But fish oils interfere with inflammation, thereby reducing its effect.

University of Queensland researcher Cameron McDonald says exercise is effective in rebuilding lost muscle but it’s often hard to maintain over time.

He says muscle loss exposes survivors to the prospect of earlier onset, or exacerbated, obesity-related chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

“If fish oil supplementation is effective in preventing muscle loss before it occurs, or even more effective when used in conjunction with exercise, it could significantly decrease the risk of survivors developing a chronic disease,” the PhD student says.

Research is still in its early stages and clinical trials are set to start later in the year.

Omega 3 Fish Oil benefits Intensifies the positive effect of Tamoxifen

Monday, April 11th, 2011

Female mice that ingested fish oil supplements with breast cancer drug tamoxifen appeared to have slowed the proliferation of their tumors, compared to rodents given corn oil with the drug, according to researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center.

In the controlled study, the team of scientists found that the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil helped to slow gene expression related to tumor growth.

“If a tumor was being treated with tamoxifen, the addition of an omega-3 fatty acid diet seemed to make the tumor, at least at the molecular level, more benign and less aggressive and responsive to tamoxifen,” said lead researcher Jose Russo, M.D. TakeOmega3 due to its unique high EPA formulation with 750mg EPA per capsule and its high purity of 85% omega3 would be the ideal omega3 supplement to take alongside Tamoxifen . TakeOmega3 offers the highest concentration currently available and it is uniquely manufactured in facilities licensed by MHRA (Medical Health & Regulatory Authority) here in UK . No other omega3 supplement currently offers these benefits .

Additionally, the healthy fats appeared to curb immune responses that result in allergies and inflammation. These negative effects have been known to alter the body’s natural defense against cancer.

Next, the researchers hope to investigate how omega-3 fatty acids in a diet can affect risk of breast cancer in women.

Authors of the study noted that an estimated 200,000 women are diagnosed with the disease each year.

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women, with more than 200,000 women diagnosed each year. Being exposed to estrogen over a long period of time is one factor that can increase a woman’s risk of developing the disease. One way a woman can combat this risk factor is by taking the breast cancer drug tamoxifen, which interferes with the activity of estrogen. Now, researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center have found that omega-3 fatty acids — abundant in fish — could be a safe and beneficial booster for tamoxifen therapy.

Jose Russo, MD, director of the Breast Cancer Research Laboratory at Fox Chase, is presenting the new findings at the AACR 102nd Annual Meeting 2011 on April 6.
To investigate how fish oil intensifies the effects of tamoxifen, Russo, in collaboration with a team led by Andrea Manni, MD, from Pennsylvania State University, induced mammary tumors in rats and then divided the animals into four groups. They fed the groups either a 17 percent fish oil diet, with or without tamoxifen, or a 20 percent corn oil diet, with or without tamoxifen, for eight weeks. They then analyzed gene expression patterns in the tumors. Omega-3 fatty acids produced a greater expression of genes related to cellular specialization, or differentiation — a sign of lower cancer severity — compared to corn oil. The combination of fish oil and tamoxifen reduced the expression of genes linked to tumor growth and spreading.

“The fish oil diet also boosted the expression of genes related to immune defenses against tumors, more so than did the corn oil diet. But omega-3 fatty acids simultaneously increased the expression of genes that trigger counterproductive immune responses, such as inflammation and allergic reactions, which curtail the ability of cells to fight cancer and can even promote the migration of tumor cells.

More studies are needed to fully understand the effects of fish oil on the immune system, Russo says. Meanwhile, his team is examining whether omega-3 fatty acids can prevent breast cancer in animals and testing the influence of diet on breast cancer risk in women.

Co-authors on the study include Bidinotto, L.T.; Vanegas, J.E.; Vanden Heuvel, J.P.; Lopez, R.; Santucci-Pereira, J.; Washington, S., Xu; H., Russo I.H.; El-Bayoumy, K.; and Manni, A. from Fox Chase.

Omega 3 EPA fish oil benefits helps prevent obesity related diseases such as diabetes and heart disease

Friday, March 25th, 2011

A new study has suggested that a high intake of omega-3 fats found in fish helps prevent obesity-related chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease. Fish oil benefits .

The scientists come to the conclusion after studying Yup’ik Eskimos in Alaska, who on average consume 20 times more omega-3 fats from fish than people in the lower 48 states.

Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in collaboration conducted the study with the Center for Alaska Native Health Research at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks.

The fats the researchers were interested in measuring were those found in salmon, sardines and other fatty fish: docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA, and eicosapentaenoic acid, or EPA.

Researchers analyzed data from a community-based study of 330 people living in the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta region of southwest Alaska, 70 percent of whom were overweight or obese.

As expected, the researchers found that in participants with low blood levels of DHA and EPA, obesity strongly increased both blood triglycerides (a blood lipid abnormality) and C-reactive protein, or CRP (a measure of overall body inflammation).

Elevated levels of triglycerides and CRP increase the risk of heart disease and, possibly, diabetes.

“These results mimic those found in populations living in the Lower 48 who have similarly low blood levels of EPA and DHA,” said senior author Alan Kristal.

“However, the new finding was that obesity did not increase these risk factors among study participants with high blood levels of omega-3 fats, he said.

Lead author Zeina Makhoul said, “Interestingly, we found that obese persons with high blood levels of omega-3 fats had triglyceride and CRP concentrations that did not differ from those of normal-weight persons.

“It appeared that high intakes of omega-3-rich seafood protected Yup’ik Eskios from some of the harmful effects of obesity,” Makhoul added.

The study was published online March 23 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. (ANI)

Omega 3 EPA curbs precancerous growths in those prone to bowel cancer, study suggests.

Tuesday, March 15th, 2011

A purified form of omega 3 EPA cuts the number and size of precancerous bowel growths (polyps) in people whose genetic make-up predisposes them to bowel cancer, finds research published ahead of print in the journal Gut. Furthermore, this particular omega 3 (eicosapentaenoic acid or EPA) seems to be as effective as the prescription medicine used to treat familial bowel polyps, but without the associated cardiovascular side effects.
The researchers base their findings on 55 patients, all of whom had the inherited genetic mutation that prompts the development of precancerous polyps in the bowel — known as familial adenomatous polyposis, or FAP for short.
People with FAP are at significantly increased risk of developing bowel cancer and require surgery to remove large sections of their bowel. Subsequently, some also need regular monitoring. All 55 patients had previously undergone surgery and were being monitored by endoscopy — a procedure involving a camera on the end of a flexible tube passed through the rectum.
Twenty eight of the patients were randomly assigned to six months of treatment with 2 g daily of a new highly purified form of the omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) EPA. The other 27 were given the same amount of a dummy treatment (placebo).
. Dietary omega 3 PUFA mainly comes from oily fish, such as salmon, mackerel, and herring.
An assessment of the number and size of polyps at the beginning and end of the six month study period revealed significant differences between the two groups of patients. The number of polyps increased by almost 10% among those treated with the placebo, but fell by more than 12% among those treated with the EPA capsules, representing a difference of almost 22.5%.
This was still clinically significant, even after taking account of influential factors, such as age and sex.
Similarly, polyp size increased by more than 17% among those in the placebo group but fell by more than 12.5% in those taking the EPA capsules, representing a difference of just under 30%.
The authors note that the effects of EPA were similar to those produced by celecoxib, which is used to help curb the growth of new and existing polyps in patients with FAP.
The use of celecoxib has been associated with harmful cardiovascular side effects in older patients. In this study, EPA produced few side effects and these were no more common than those produced by the placebo. This formulation of omega 3 might also help to prevent bowel cancer in people with the common non-familial form of bowel polyps, suggest the authors. As omega 3 PUFAs in general are safe and even good for cardiovascular health, Take Omega 3 EPA could be especially suitable for older patients at risk of both bowel cancer and heart disease, they say.

Depression study confirms effectiveness of EPA as anti depressant treatment

Tuesday, March 15th, 2011

The use of Omega-3 supplements is effective among patients with major depression who do not have anxiety disorders, according to a study directed by Dr. François Lespérance of the Centre de recherche du Centre hospitalier at the Université de Montréal (CRCHUM), head of CHUM’s Department of Psychiatry and a professor at the Université de MontréalThe study was published June 15 in the online Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.Take Omega3 is the ideal formulation to treat depression due to each capsule containing 750mg EPA and 50mg DHA it is an 85% concentrate which is the highest currently available.

This was the largest study ever conducted assessing Omega-3’s efficacy in treating major depression. It was carried out in conjunction with researchers from centres affiliated with the UdM’s Réseau universitaire intégré de santé (RUIS), from McGill University, Université Laval in Quebec City and Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario.

Initial analyses failed to clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of Omega-3 for all patients taking part in the study. Other analyses, however, revealed that Omega-3 improved depression symptoms in patients diagnosed with depression unaccompanied by an anxiety disorder. Efficacy for these patients was comparable to that generally observed with conventional antidepressant treatment.

From October 2005 to January 2009, 432 male and female participants with major unipolar depression were recruited to take part in this randomized, double-blind study (neither patients nor researchers knew which capsules patients received)Some 11% of men and 16% of women in Canada will suffer from major depression at some point in their lives, making this disorder one of our society’s leading public health issues. Depression, which is now the world’s fourth leading cause of morbidity and death is expected to move up to the number two position by 2020. “Despite significant progress in neuroscience over the past two decades, depression is difficult to treat,” Dr. Lespérance noted. In view of the large number of patients who stop taking their medications in the first few months of treatment and those who refuse such treatment due to fear of stigmatization or side effects, it comes as no surprise that a large number of patients suffering from major depression use alternative treatments offered outside the healthcare system. “Many of these treatments have not been adequately evaluated. That is why it was important to assess the efficacy of Omega-3, one of the most popular alternative approaches,” he added.

Epidemiological and neurobiological studies have suggested that a relative deficit in polyunsaturated fatty acids of the Omega-3 group may predispose individuals to psychological disorders such as depression. Further, several preliminary clinical studies based on small numbers of patients have suggested that Omega-3 supplements with high concentrations of EPA can help to reduce symptoms of depression among patients who fail to respond to an initial antidepressant treatment. These studies have not, however, convinced the entire scientific community. A broader study was needed to acquire further knowledge about the properties and efficacy of high-quality Omega-3 supplements among patients suffering from major depression.udy.

It is important to note that the study assessed use of Omega-3 for eight weeks, at doses of 1050 mg of EPA and 150 mg of DHA each day. It is currently unknown whether taking higher doses or taking supplements over a longer period would yield different results.

These encouraging results show that use of EPA is effective among patients with unipolar depression unaccompanied by an anxiety disorder. Additional research directly comparing Omega-3 with conventional antidepressants could more clearly confirm their usefulness for patients suffering from depression

Researchers confirm EPA is powerful natural antidepressant Takeomega3 750mg EPA

Tuesday, March 15th, 2011

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have confirmed that omega-3 fatty acids exhibit powerful antidepressant and brain boosting benefits that have not received the high level of attention they deserve. The team, led by Dr. John M. Davis, discovered that eicosapentenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) — two types of omega-3 fatty acids recognized for their powerful nutritional benefits — are effective enough at improving mood that they may potentially eliminate the need for many people to take antidepressant drugs.

The researchers analyzed 15 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies about omega-3s and found that taking either EPA alone or EPA together with DHA helps to alleviate depression symptoms And since DHA alone did not exhibit antidepressant benefits, the team has identified EPA as the primary active compound in improving mental health.

“Our analysis clarifies the precise type of omega-3 fatty acid that is effective for people with depression and explains why previous findings have been contradictory,” explained Davis. “The EPA predominant formulation is necessary for the therapeutic action to occur.”

People who are deficient in omega-3s are more likely to experience depression than people have consume adequate amounts. Davis and his team found in a previous study that pregnant women deficient in omega-3s are more prone to depression during and after pregnancy than those who get enough of it.
Take Omega 3 has 750 mg of the key active omega3 EPA per capsule as a result it is a true one per day dose as its 85% concentrate. Consumers should be aware that just because a product states it 1000mg omega 3 it may infact have very low levels of omega 3

Breast Cancer now affecting one in eight women can takeomega3 help prevent this disease ?

Friday, February 4th, 2011

This shocking statistic is believed to be a result of the way we now live our lives . Alcohol , lack of exercise , stress and dietary factors are all believed to contribute to this . Can omega 3 play a part in preventing women getting breast cancer ? What can women do to help reduce the risk of getting breast cancer ? These will perhaps be the questions that most women not only in UK but globally as breast cancer is a true global disease. The first study of its kind has revealed that postmenopausal women who took the omega 3 supplements reduced risk by a third.

The research, which involved 35,000 women and took six years to complete, has caused such excitement among experts that they are calling for larger and more detailed studies to urgently be carried out. Could the very action of take a high grade omega 3 supplement such as takeomega3 help in some way to prevent breast cancer ? Takeomega 3 has the highest levels of EPA currently available of any omega3 supplement with 750mg per capsule as a result it is an extremely potent anti inflammatory formulation.

They hope that it may be possible to use fish oils as a way to help women slash their risk of suffering from breast tumours.

Fish Oil contains high levels of fatty acids that can reduce inflammation. Studies have already suggested they may boost brain cells, keep eyes healthy and possibly protect against ageing.

But other studies have dismissed these claims, saying the evidence is still not there. The latest study, by a respected team in America, is the first to actively monitor women who take fish oils and see how many develop breast cancer

The team also looked at whether other supplements like St John’s Wort, soy and ginkgo biloba had any affect on the risk of tumours. All of the women in the study were between 50 and 76 and had been through the menopause.

They were asked if they had taken fish oils before or were taking them at the start of the study and how often they took them.

The team, whose study is published in the Journal of Cancer, Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, found 83 per cent took fish oils at least four times a week and 60 per cent daily. During the following six years, 880 suffered from breast cancer.

The data revealed that those who took fish oils at the start of the study had a 32 per cent reduced risk of ductal breast cancer, the most common form of the disease which affects eight in 10 sufferers.

However, there was no reduction in risk of lobular breast cancer that affects around one in 10 sufferers. Nor was there a reduced risk of women who had taken fish oils up to a decade earlier but stopped or those who took other supplements.

The team, from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, said the findings were interesting but it was too early to say if the fish oil is responsible. Scientists believe fish oils might work by reducing inflammation which may prevent cells from becoming damaged and turning cancerous.

Previous studies on cells in the lab and on animals both suggest fish oils might be able to protect against cancer. Scientists are keen to find an answer because more and more people have been taking supplements for decades.

This means they have been used for long enough to gauge whether they are having a positive or negative effect on long-term health. So far British experts warn against taking multi-vitamins to protect against cancer, with some warning they may increase the risk.

But the evidence on fish oils is less clear.Dr Panagiota Mitrou, deputy head of science for the World Cancer Research Fund, said: “The findings are very interesting because it is the first time fish oil has been linked to lower breast cancer risk in this type of study.

“But as the authors suggest, because this is a single study the findings are not enough for us to be confident that women can reduce their risk of breast cancer by taking fish oil supplements. More research is now needed to find out if this is actually the case.

“There is already very strong scientific evidence about how women can reduce their breast cancer risk. In fact scientists estimate that about 40 per cent of breast cancer cases in the UK could be prevented through being physically active, maintaining a healthy weight and reducing the alcohol they drink.”

Great Britain Flag
Made in the UK - Take Omega 3 Suspendisse lacinia ultricies justo, at ultricies nisi tempus ac. Cras sed vehicula metus. Phasellus...