Posts Tagged ‘cancer’

Omega 3 Fish Oil Increases Chemotherapy success and may contribute to increased survival rate

Friday, February 10th, 2012

Omega 3 Fish Oil Increases Chemotherapy success and may contribute to increased survival rate
Murphy RA, Mourtzakis M, Chu QS, et al. Supplementation with fish oil increases first-line chemotherapy efficacy in patients with advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer. Cancer. 2011 Aug 15;117(16):3774-80.
BACKGROUND: Palliative chemotherapy is aimed at increasing survival and palliating symptoms. However, the response rate to first-line chemotherapy in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is less than 30%. Experimental studies have shown that supplementation with omega3 fish oil can increase chemotherapy efficacy without negatively affecting nontarget tissue. This study evaluated whether the combination of omega3 fish oil and chemotherapy (carboplatin with vinorelbine or gemcitabine) provided a benefit over standard of care (SOC) on response rate and clinical benefit from chemotherapy in patients with advanced NSCLC.

METHODS: Forty-six patients completed the study, n = 31 in the SOC group and n = 15 in the FO group (2.5 g EPA / DHA per day day). Response to chemotherapy was determined by clinical examination and imaging. Response rate was defined as the sum of complete response plus partial response, and clinical benefit was defined as the sum of complete response, partial response, and stable disease divided by the number of patients. Toxicities were graded by a nurse before each chemotherapy cycle. Survival was calculated 1 year after study enrollment.

RESULTS: Patients in the Omega 3 Fish Oil group had an increased response rate and greater clinical benefit compared with the SOC group (60.0% vs 25.8%, P = .008; 80.0% vs 41.9%, P = .02, respectively). The incidence of dose-limiting toxicity did not differ between groups (P = .46). One-year survival tended to be greater in the FO group (60.0% vs 38.7%; P = .15).

CONCLUSIONS: Compared with SOC, supplementation with omega3 fish oil results in increased chemotherapy efficacy without affecting the toxicity profile and may contribute to increased survival.

Omega3 fish oil essential fatty acids EPA and DHA may prevent and treat ovarian cancer

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2011

According to MedlinePlus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine from the National Institutes of Health, the cause of ovarian cancer is not yet known. Often no symptoms are evident until ovarian cancer is well-advanced. Sometimes there are no indicators in the early stages.Possible symptoms are abnormal periods, back pain or pain in the lower abdomen. A woman may experience a feeling of heaviness in the pelvic region, nausea or vomiting, vaginal bleeding. She may be subject to unexplained weight gain or loss.Ovarian cancer is more common in women past the age of 50 though it can occur in younger women. According to Medline Plus, the usual treatment is surgery and chemotherapy treatments. Fish oil containing the active essential fatty acids EPA and DHA is believed to both prevent and treat ovarian cancer. Best sources of EPA and DHA essential fatty acids are oily fish such as sardines , anchovies , salmon or by taking a high quality , high concentration omega3 supplement such as TakeOmega3 which offers highest concentration of EPA and is manufactured uniquely in MHRA facilities (Medical Health and Regulatory Authority). Other sources of omega3 is flaxseed though this is not nearly as effective as only some of the alpha-linolenic acid in flaxseed can be converted into docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) which are also omega-3 fatty acids. Fish oil is more effective in this respect than flaxseed. Dr Walter Millet advocates taking fish oil and flax to reap full benefits of both. Willett is chair of the nutrition department at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston.

Ovarian cancer is diagnosed in about 25,000 women in the U.S. every year, with 15,000 of these cases ending in death. Prospects are not good for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer since the cancer is usually discovered in its late stages, having metastasized and spread through the body.In the UK it is the 5th most common form of Cancer and it is estimated 1 out of 54 women in the UK are at risk of developing it over their lifetime. By making a simple dietary change they can reduce their risk of ovarian cancer simply by eating oily fish two to three times a week or by taking an omega3 supplement such as takeomega3 .

These findings about omega-3 fatty acids offer hope of more effective treatment in future.

This research was funded by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Grant, an American Institute for Cancer Research Grant, and an NIH Training Grant. It was published in Gynecologic Oncology.

This ArticlPossible symptoms are abnormal periods, back pain or pain in the lower abdomen. A woman may experience a feeling of heaviness in the pelvic region, nausea or vomiting, vaginal bleeding. She may be subject to unexplained weight gain or loss.Ovarian cancer is more common in women past the age of 50 though it can occur in younger women. According to Medline Plus, the usual treatment is surgery and chemotherapy treatments.

A July 10, 2011 article from Sciencelatest.com reported, omega-3 essential fatty acids from fish oil may assist in preventing and treating ovarian cancer.

Supplementation with omega 3 fish oil increases first-line chemotherapy efficacy in patients

Thursday, July 28th, 2011

BACKGROUND:
Palliative chemotherapy is aimed at increasing survival and palliating symptoms. However, the response rate to first-line chemotherapy in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is less than 30%. Experimental studies have shown that supplementation with omega 3  fish oil (FO) can increase chemotherapy efficacy without negatively affecting nontarget tissue. This study evaluated whether the combination of omega3 and fish oil and chemotherapy (carboplatin with vinorelbine or gemcitabine) provided a benefit over standard of care (SOC) on response rate and clinical benefit from chemotherapy in patients with advanced NSCLC.

METHODS:
Forty-six patients completed the study, n = 31 in the SOC group and n = 15 in the Omega 3 Fish oil  group (2.5 g EPA + DHA/day). Response to chemotherapy was determined by clinical examination and imaging. Response rate was defined as the sum of complete response plus partial response, and clinical benefit was defined as the sum of complete response, partial response, and stable disease divided by the number of patients. Toxicities were graded by a nurse before each chemotherapy cycle. Survival was calculated 1 year after study enrollment.

RESULTS:
Patients in the omega 3 fish oil group had an increased response rate and greater clinical benefit compared with the SOC group (60.0% vs 25.8%, P = .008; 80.0% vs 41.9%, P = .02, respectively). The incidence of dose-limiting toxicity did not differ between groups (P = .46). One-year survival tended to be greater in the FO group (60.0% vs 38.7%; P = .15).

CONCLUSIONS:
Compared with SOC, supplementation with omega 3 fish oil  results in increased chemotherapy efficacy without affecting the toxicity profile and may contribute to increased survival. Cancer 2011;. © 2011 American Cancer Society.

Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

Omega 3 fish oil potential anti cancer linked with decrease in tumour formation.

Thursday, July 28th, 2011

Suppressed liver tumorigenesis in fat-1 mice with elevated omega-3 fatty acids is associated with increased omega-3 derived lipid mediators and reduced TNF-α.

Weylandt KH, Krause LF, Gomolka B, Chiu CY, Bilal S, Nadolny A, Waechter SF, Fischer A, Rothe M, Kang JX.
Source

Laboratory for Lipid Medicine and Technology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. karsten.weylandt@charite.de
Abstract
Liver tumors, particularly hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The development of HCC is mostly associated with chronic inflammatory liver disease of various etiologies. Previous studies have shown that omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) dampen inflammation in the liver and decrease formation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. In this study, we used the fat-1 transgenic mouse model, which endogenously forms n-3 PUFA from n-6 PUFA to determine the effect of an increased n-3 PUFA tissue status on tumor formation in the diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced liver tumor model. Our results showed a decrease in tumor formation, in terms of size and number, in fat-1 mice compared with wild-type littermates. Plasma TNF-α levels and liver cyclooxygenase-2 expression were markedly lower in fat-1 mice. Furthermore, there was a decreased fibrotic activity in the livers of fat-1 mice. Lipidomics analyses of lipid mediators revealed significantly increased levels of the n-3 PUFA-derived 18-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (18-HEPE) and 17-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA) in the livers of fat-1 animals treated with DEN. In vitro experiments showed that 18-HEPE and 17-HDHA could effectively suppress lipopolysacharide-triggered TNF-α formation in a murine macrophage cell line. The results of this study provide evidence that an increased tissue status of n-3 PUFA suppresses liver tumorigenesis, probably through inhibiting liver inflammation. The findings also point to a potential anticancer role for the n-3 PUFA-derived lipid mediators 18-HEPE and 17-HDHA, which can downregulate the important proinflammatory and proproliferative factor TNF-α.

PMID: 21421544 [PubMed - in process] PMCID: PMC3106436 [Available on 2012/6/1]

Omega 3 EPA helps prevent cancer induced weightloss in children

Thursday, July 28th, 2011

ayram I, Erbey F, Celik N, et al. The use of a protein and energy dense eicosapentaenoic acid containing supplement for malignancy-related weight loss in children. Pediatr Blood Cancer; Turkey
Background
The aim of nutritional therapy in cancer patients is to prevent weight loss and to improve functional capacity and quality of life. Clinical studies however, have continued to demonstrate that a reduction in body weight loss is difficult to achieve in cancer cachexia. Several studies have shown that supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega-3 fatty acid, has anti-cachectic effects in adult cancer patients. This study evaluated the clinical effects of a protein and energy dense EPA containing nutritional supplement in a group of pediatric cancer patients receiving active chemotherapy treatment.

Methods
The study was a prospective, randomized, single center, open-label design. Fifty-two patients diagnosed with pediatric malignant disease and receiving intensive chemotherapy were included. Thirty-three patients received a nutritional supplement containing EPA in addition to their regular food intake. Nineteen control patients did not receive supplementation. Patients were examined and their data (body weight, body mass index, and weight percentile) were recorded regularly once a month for 3 months. A subgroup of patients was evaluated for 6 months.

Results
At 3 months, there were significantly fewer patients in the treatment group as compared to controls that showed losses in body weight (P = 0.001), BMI (P = 0.002), and a negative deviation in weight percentile (P = 0.021). In addition, remission rate was significantly (P = 0.036) higher in the treatment group as compared to controls.

Conclusions
This study demonstrates a decrease in cancer-induced weight loss in pediatric patients fed a protein and energy dense nutrition supplement containing EPA. Pediatr Blood Cancer

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